Obituary photo of Noah Grant, Denver-CO
In Loving Memory of

Noah Robert Grant

1931 - 2022
Obituary photo of Noah Grant, Denver-CO
In Loving Memory of

Noah Robert Grant

1931 - 2022
Newcomer - West Metro Chapel (303-274-6065) is assisting the family
Noah Robert Grant Junior, of Wheatridge, CO, passed away on July 2, 2022, at the age of 91, from COVID related pneumonia complications.
He was born to Noah “Node “Robert Grant and Evelyn Loretta Smith Grant during the Great Depression, on January 21, 1931, in Woodward, OK. Shortly after his birth, his parents relocated their small family to Northwest CO where his father obtained a mining job in the small town of Hamilton, CO. Since times were financially challenging, Noah and his parents first resided in a cave. As the economy continued to decline, miners began losing their jobs, so his father switched to nearby ranching at the base of Dunkley Pass, where the family was able to move into an unfinished rustic log cabin.

Noah spent these early formative years living off the land and attended a one room schoolhouse on Dunkley Pass. Only three to four other students attended this combined grade school, and Noah walked a few miles each day to get to and from the school. Outside of school, Noah became skilled at trapping animals and selling their pelts. It was during this time that he developed his remarkable sense of wilderness navigation, always taking note of landmarks and the terrain so that he could return home safely.
When it was time to enter high school, Noah moved to Hayden, CO, staying with a family friend, so that he could attend the town’s high school. This gave him opportunities to have a larger peer group and join sports activities. He played football and made several friendships, many he maintained over the years. During summer breaks, he worked at his uncle’s farm in Flagler, CO, driving the 300 miles alone, on his motorcycle. He learned dry land farming but yearned to expand his horizons by becoming a pilot. After graduating in 1950, he spent one final summer farming in Flagler before joining the Air Force. Unfortunately, the military found that he needed glasses for distance vision which eliminated his dreams of becoming a pilot.
While in the Air Force, Noah received training in aircraft repair from Embry Riddle University and saw several parts of the country. He spent most of his military career repairing instruments on jets and prop planes, seeing Guam, Japan, Hawaii, and AK along with other US bases. While he enjoyed seeing different parts of the world, he decided to leave after his four years ended and received an honorable discharge. He then worked for Ladd Air Force Base and Wien Alaska Airlines before deciding that he needed more training in his profession.
He returned to the lower forty-eight to attend Coyne Electrical School in Chicago and took classes from IBM to become an electrical technician. After this training, he took a position at Continental Airlines working on jet instrumentation in Denver. In December of 1957, he met Evelyn Bradshaw at the Central Presbyterian Church in Denver. They began dating, had a short courtship, and got married on August 10, 1958. They rented an apartment in Denver while Evelyn taught in Denver Public Schools and Noah continued working for Continental Airlines at the nearby Stapleton Airport. They spent every spare moment of their free time building a home in Arvada, CO. Although Noah had learned basic farm and ranch construction, he checked out books at the library to expand his building knowledge. Noah and Evelyn constructed their entire house except for the brick work. In 1962, they moved into this incomplete home and welcomed their daughter, Risë Lynn, into the world. They continued finishing their home and a had a son, Clifford Milton, in 1964.
During this busy time, Noah learned that Continental was moving to Los Angeles and switched jobs because he didn’t want to leave Colorado. He began working on instrumentation at Rocky Flats, a U.S. nuclear weapons plant where he continued working until his retirement in 1989. Once the Arvada house was complete, he and Evelyn bought land on Gore Pass and began building a cabin. The family spent most of their spare time in the mountains – working on the cabin, snowmobiling, hiking, and fishing. Noah and Evelyn were also active members of the Mile High Snowmobile Club and were fortunate to take several trips with the group and made several long-lasting friendships with other members. Noah also enjoyed archery hunting and taught his son the basics of bow hunting and how to navigate in the wilderness. He and Clifford continued archery elk hunting every year and loved their annual adventure in the wild. On one of their last trips, Noah broke his ankle but didn’t complain and managed to hike out over two miles, through rough terrain, until help arrived.
Noah and Evelyn were blessed when their children married and stayed in CO. They acquired a son-in-law and daughter-in-law, Chuck Meyer and Holly Grant, as well as several grandchildren: Cynthia, Melissa, Robert “Bobby”, Keith (deceased) and Janielle. Noah enjoyed teaching his grandchildren about the outdoors as well as how to hike, fish, snowmobile, and ski. His grandchildren remember him telling them that they were “bear bait” if they were the last on a hike, which was his persuasive way of getting them to stop dilly dallying on a hike.
Noah and Evelyn also moved from Arvada to Wheat Ridge to begin constructing a new home after the local fire department began building on both sides of their Arvada home. Due to timelines, they hired out the framing of this new house but did most of the indoor finishing.
Noah continued his active lifestyle until 2008 when he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, attributable to radiation exposure at Rocky Flats. He finished treatment for the cancer but had a stroke the day after his last cancer treatment. This stroke was later attributed to the cancer treatment, and he had a difficult time learning to walk again.
Despite his poor mobility and physical limitations, Noah continued enjoying four wheeling in the mountains and loved playing video poker at Blackhawk. He had hoped to snowmobile, but he found it too difficult to get on and off his machine when he was stuck. He also enjoyed spending time with family and friends and riding his recumbent bike and electric scooter around the neighborhood.
In his later years, Noah enjoyed reading books and newsletters on stocks and nutritional supplements and tried to impart this newfound wisdom to family members, much to their annoyance. This earned him the nickname of “Broken Record,” due to his repetitive way of trying to convey his message. According to his grandchildren, he has successfully passed this trait down to his children and surely must be smiling down from heaven. Noah was also blessed with four great grandchildren (Isabella & Isaac and Caden & Madeline) and made several friends with visiting nurses who helped care for him. Despite his physical limitations, he had a full life and was a deeply loved member of the family who will be sorely missed.
Services will be held on Friday, 8/12/22, at Newcomer Mortuary, 901 South Sheridan. Viewing will occur from 9:30 to 10:30 and the service will begin at 10:30. A lunch reception will follow at the mortuary. At 1:00 p.m., we will drive to Fort Logan for military services which will begin at 1:30 p.m.
Pallbearers: Carlos Acevedo, Robert Grant, Johnny Johnson, Logan Johnson, Justin Moore, and Scott Palguta.
Pastor Will Spilman
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Newcomer - West Metro Chapel (303-274-6065) is assisting the family

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